Jump to content

Things You Can Prepare For Internet Downtime


Recommended Posts

 

The Internet’s down, everybody panic! If you’ve ever said that, out loud, maybe it’s time to start thinking about how to prepare for outages.

Web-based services are awesome, but largely impossible to use if your Internet connection goes down. You should plan to be ready next time.

With a little preparation, even people who use web apps for just about everything can be ready to be reasonably productive during outages. Here are a few things to think about now so you’ll be ready later.

Make Cloud Files Available Offline

The cloud means all our documents are accessible anywhere with an Internet connection, but what if there isn’t one?

Well, part of the appeal of services like Dropbox and Skydrive is that they sync documents directly to your computer (although Microsoft slightly changed things for Windows 8.1). So if you use these services, and have the proper client installed, your files should be perfectly usable offline. Make changes and they’ll sync the next time you’re connected.

There’s just one potential complication: conflicting files. Shared files you edit while offline may be edited by someone else. If this happens you’ll see a conflicted version of the file when you reconnect to the web. It’s not usually a huge deal, but keep it in mind if you’re collaborating on something.

Google Drive is a little trickier. Files you simply upload to the service are perfectly accessible offline, assuming you’re using the desktop app. Things get tricky with any file formatted for editing by Google Drive’s online office suite. There are instructions for setting up offline access, but it’s a touch limited. You’ll be able to edit documents and presentations; spreadsheets are view only.

Sync Email To Your Desktop

If you use a desktop email client, good news: your emails are almost certainly accessible offline. You can read your emails and their status will be synced later, assuming you’re using IMAP instead of POP (and if you own multiple devices, you should be).

But what about those of us who stick to the webmail services like Gmail? If you’re a Gmail user, you’re in luck: Gmail Offline is a Chrome app that lets you use Gmail offline.

The interface is a little different than the standard version, sure, but it syncs whenever Chrome is open without you needing to do anything (and Gmail’s keyboard shortcuts work exactly as you’re used to).
Yahoo Mail and Microsoft’s Outlook.com/Hotmail service don’t offer an equivalent feature, so make sure you’ve got an email client set up for those services.

 

Make Your Calendar

You need to know what to dand when, whether you’re offline or not. That’s why I recommend Wise Reminder, a schedule reminding freeware, mark all the important events or things to do on it and get reminded precisely. It helps you get your life well organized especially those who spent a lot of time with computers everyday.

Tune Up Your Computer

Of course, you could always use the time to tune up your computer, run a virus scan, defragment your drive, or use the disconnected time to clean up your computer.

If you’re not sure where to start, download Wise Care 365. Make sure you have the software installed now so you can run it during offline time. Just several clicks, it will do all the rest heavy-lifting for you.

Or Just Go For A Walk

Of course, you could use the offline time as an excuse to get away from your computer altogether. Take a walk, enjoy a local part and otherwise disconnect for a little while. Your work will be waiting for you later, so why not use the down time to collect your thoughts?

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...